Grandmother’s Light Bread

To 1 package granular yeast add 1 cup warm water and 1 tablespoon sugar. Measure 6 cups pre-sifted flour, add 3 tablespoons Crisco and work lightly into flour with fingers or blender, until well mixed. Combine 1 cup tepid (scalded) milk or water with one well beaten egg and add to yeast mixture. Make a “well” in flour and add liquid and 1 teaspoon of salt. Then stir with spoon until dough gets stiff. Turn onto well-floured board and knead well, gradually adding flour until no longer sticky and moist. Make into rolls or loaf or pat out dough and cut with biscuit cutter. Fold for rolls. Bake about 30 minutes at 350°.

To make rolls or bread I use warm water instead of milk.

To make a loaf that needs no slicing: cut dough with biscuit cutter, dip one side in melted butter or margarine and stack into pan, working from one end.

To make rolls: follow above direction except to fold dough in middle and pinch round edges together.

To make cinnamon bread: dip “biscuits” in 4 tablespoon melted butter, 1 cup brown sugar mixed with 1 teaspoon cinnamon and stack into your favorite pan. Try one in your fluted cake pan. Use more butter as needed.

Maude Hersman deGruyter

I think this may have been recorded by my mother, Anna Mary McVaney deGruyter, and the notes are probably hers.  My grandmother’s mother died when she was 10, and she lived with her Aunt Mag (Margaret Hersman Camp, her father’s sister), who had 10 sons and no daughters.  They baked light bread for a dozen three times a day. It is called ‘light bread’ to distinguish it from corn bread, which was probably more common.

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