OK, I don’t want to leave anyone with the impression that the hospital did anything medically dangerous. They had me hooked me up to an IV which should have been disconnected, to oxygen (have no idea why – my blood oxygen was 100% going into surgery), to those leg massagers to prevent blood clots, and then every time I asked for assistance so I could go to the bathroom (which was a lot, since I could only have clear liquids and they still had me on the IV) asked me why I needed assistance. Of course, if I hadn’t been hooked up to all that stuff, I would have been up walking around with no danger of blood clots in my legs. And no information whatsoever about why they were doing what, and no checks except for the tech taking blood pressure and temperature every four hours. They were surly when I asked questions. Needless to say, I felt pretty much like I had been tied to the bed and abandoned. Robert had left because the evening shift nurse seemed just fine – very helpful and friendly. Once it was daylight I called Robert. When I asked when my doctor was going to be there so I could be released, I was told there was nothing indicating I was being released that day, and doctors were very busy and didn’t have time to check on patients (I’m quoting, truly!), so I called my surgeon’s office. My surgeon showed up and disconnected all that stuff herself and noted they hadn’t even kept up my chart. If I had had to stay another hour or two, I probably would have thrown something at someone.

It was just disappointing not to feel cared for at a very stressful time, all the more so because all the medical professionals (except that infamous plastic surgeon) up to then had been wonderful. All the staff in the surgery center were great, and I had had good experiences with day surgery and the dye test for the port-a-cath there. Seton has all these giant posters up with their mission with stuff about being patient-centered and all that. Bleh.

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